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Orchestra Victoria is a specialist Ballet and Opera Orchestra; advocate for music education; and performs throughout metropolitan and regional Victoria. Let us take you behind the scenes to discover how it all happens.

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  • Musings of a Muso: If Food Be The Music Of Love

    Posted on 26 October 2020

    Musings of a Muso: If Food Be The Music Of Love
    As we in Melbourne slowly emerge from the throes of a pandemic, and the possibility of playing on proffers a small beacon of light for our darkened theatres, homely kitchens and an epicurean philosophy can transform a deep sense of artistic and creative loss into a surfeit of pleasure and tranquility. Let Orchestra Victoria violinist Rebecca Adler take you on a culinary journey that will warm your heart, and help you transform the absence of music into a mouth-watering repast. 

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  • Mozart and his Operas: The Trials and Triumphs

    Posted on 6 October 2020

    Mozart and his Operas: The Trials and Triumphs
    With their stunningly lyrical arias, intricate recitatives, and ground-breaking instrumentation, the operas of Mozart hold a special place in the hearts of Orchestra Victoria’s musicians. Here, Associate Principal flautist Karen Schofield – can you guess her favourite Mozart opera?? - speaks to a collection of colleagues about their appreciation for the singular genius of this much-loved composer.

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  • Don Quixote, the Movie: An Exquisite Portrayal of Futility

    Posted on 16 September 2020

    Don Quixote, the Movie: An Exquisite Portrayal of Futility
    In 1973, the ensemble now known as Orchestra Victoria, under John Lanchbery and Rudolph Nureyev, provided the score for a very special project: the motion picture adaptation of Don Quixote. Priceless memories remain of this landmark production, as OV cellist Tania Hardy-Smith discovers in these delightful anecdotes and explorations.

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  • We Wish You a Merry Widow: Part 2

    Posted on 15 August 2020

    We Wish You a Merry Widow: Part 2
    The story of the Merry Widow captures a moment in time when fantasy was a welcome distraction from the troubles of the world. Orchestra Victoria Cellist, Tania Hardy-Smith, offers us our own moment to escape reality and view the sumptuous work by Lehár through the lens of the relationship between this beloved work, our beloved Orchestra and The Australian Ballet.

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  • We Wish You a Merry Widow: Part 1

    Posted on 8 August 2020

    We Wish You a Merry Widow: Part 1
    When Franz Lehár’s operetta 'Die lustige Witwe' was first performed in 1905 in Vienna, it was an immediate success, and has since continued to be adored by audiences throughout the world. An achingly sentimental love story, luscious tunes – who could forget Vilja? - and the sparkling setting of la belle époque make The Merry Widow irresistible. Sounds simple? Come backstage with Rebecca Adler as she explores with singers and musicians the more complex character of this exquisite artform.

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  • Music and Protest: Khachaturian, Spartacus and a Revolution or Two

    Posted on 2 August 2020

    Music and Protest: Khachaturian, Spartacus and a Revolution or Two
    Composers have always been at the forefront of protest, passionately articulating through music their abhorrence to war, oppressive regimes and the erosion of individual rights. In the music for the ballet 'Spartacus', Khachaturian invokes the fury felt by Spartacus for himself and his fellow captives, while also representing the despair and poignancy of his fated love for Phrygia. Delve further into the power of music to represent a force for change in this article by Karen Schofield, Associate Principal Flute.

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  • Following the Leader: The Concertmaster’s Job in an Opera Ballet Orchestra

    Posted on 25 July 2020

    Following the Leader: The Concertmaster’s Job in an Opera Ballet Orchestra
    In the first of our #OVLongReads about Orchestra Victoria’s leaders through the years, we speak to five of our past Concertmasters about their thoughts on leadership, in the pit and behind the scenes.

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  • “Gisellitis” in the pit

    Posted on 21 June 2020

    “Gisellitis” in the pit
    The needs of the musicians, dancers, narrative arc and the laws of physics are just a few of the forces a ballet conductor has to contend with in any performance, and in ‘Giselle’ the score poses an formidable challenge. Continuing on from yesterday’s article on “Gisellitis”, Orchestra Victoria’s Artistic Director Nicolette Fraillon explains the conductor’s version of this affliction.

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  • "Gisellitis": A Love For Which There Is No Cure

    Posted on 20 June 2020

    "Gisellitis": A Love For Which There Is No Cure
    Associate Principal Flute Karen Schofield speaks to her Orchestra Victoria colleagues about the phenomenon of “Giselleitis”. Read on to explore the challenges, and ultimately the rewards one experiences when performing this beloved ballet.

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  • Musings of a Muso: A Team Player

    Posted on 31 May 2020

    Musings of a Muso: A Team Player
    For many people across all walks of life, this period of physical distancing has been a time of soul-searching, amid unprecedented challenges. OV violinist Rebecca Adler reflects on the experience of being isolated from one’s orchestra, and the highs and lows of life as a musician in lockdown.

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  • David Page on the Music for Warumuk: In the Dark Night

    Posted on 27 May 2020

    David Page on the Music for Warumuk: In the Dark Night
    In 2012, Bangarra’s resident composer David Page wrote the music for Warumuk – in the dark night as part of the Infinity program, commissioned for The Australian Ballet’s 50th anniversary. We are deeply grateful to have been granted permission to bring you David’s beautiful words on the process of writing for an orchestra, and hearing his work in the rehearsal studio for the first time.

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